News Room

The latest news from BUIRA

University of Manchester's Work & Equalities Institute - Research Seminar: " Psychic Income: Working for Nothing in the Creative Industries "

University of Manchester

Work and Equalities Institute (WEI)

Research Seminar

 

Psychic Income: Working for Nothing in the Creative Industries

Professor Irena Grugulis (Leeds University Business School)

 

Date: Wednesday 8th May 2019

Time: 15:30 - 17:00 Hrs (coffee and tea at 15:15)

Venue: Alliance Manchester Business School, Room 3.009

 

Abstract

Psychic income, the intrinsic satisfaction that people get from work, is traditionally used as an explanation for low pay and seen only in its negative form, as compensation. There is little understanding of what constitutes psychic reward, nor of how and or whom it benefits. This article challenges that. Psychic rewards are positive attributes in their own right. They are also variable, just as financial rewards are, so people can be exploited psychically as well as financially. Drawing on detailed qualitative research into film and TV production it argues that psychic rewards in the form of creative and interesting work was important and often featured in contractual discussions, but that it was the established professionals who were most capable of negotiating for creativity. Here the idea of individual bargaining power is combined with that of psychic reward to distinguish between bargains at different stages in professionals’ working lives. Novices experienced exploitation, those developing skills found work intensified, and established professionals negotiated for earnings and creativity. All professionals were prepared to accept low (or no) pay in exchange for a ‘good credit’, but most of the positive aspects of psychic reward were reserved for the established professionals.

 

About the Speaker

Irena Grugulis is Professor of Work and Skills at Leeds University Business School.  Her research focuses on skills, particularly the way people learn in and at work and the ways in which work may either limit or encourage that learning.  Her work has been funded by the ESRC, EPSRC and EU and has been published in Organization Studies, Journal of Management Studies, British Journal of Industrial Relations, Work, Employment and Society and Human Resource Management Journal. She has also published two sole-authored textbooks, A Very Short, Fairly Interesting and Reasonably Cheap Book About Human Resource Management (Sage, 2017) and Skills, Training and Human Resource Development (Palgrave Macmillan, 2007).  Irena is an ESRC/AIM Services Fellow, an Associate Fellow of SKOPE and an Academic Fellow of the CIPD. She served on the Academic Advisory Panel of the UKCES and contributed to a number of governmental skills enquiries including the Leitch Review and the National Skills Task Force as well as advising the Singaporean Government.  She has been both Editor and Joint Editor in Chief of Work, Employment and Society and currently chairs the journal’s Editorial Board.

 

17th April 2019

Debating the Future of Work: Challenges and Future Prospects

Hilton Hotel Sheffield, 28-29 May 2019

This two-day conference is being organised by the Centre for Decent Work (CDW) at the University of Sheffield in collaboration with the International Labour Organisation (ILO). The recent report by the ILO’s Global Commission on the Future of Work Commission, which represents the culmination of the ILO’s centenary initiative on the future of work, describes ways in which the world of work might be improved. The conference will bring together leading academics and ILO officials to discuss issues raised by the report and other matters that are of central importance to the future of work and the future research agenda. The themes to be addressed will include:

  • Labour market transitions, skills and lifelong learning;

  • New forms of employment and the future of social protection;

  • Diversity and inclusion;

  • Ageing, caring and wellbeing;

  • Work organisation, technology and job quality;

  • Governance, labour administration and social dialogue

  • Work and the environment;

  • The future research agenda.

 The conference will feature invited contributions from researchers based at universities in various countries, including Australia, Canada, Denmark, Ireland, Japan, the USA and UK, providing opportunities for international sharing of knowledge and experience and also network building. Confirmed speakers include Marian Baird (Sydney), Burt Barnow (George Washington), Nelarine Cornelius (Queen Mary), Pauline Dibben (Sheffield), Janet Fast (Alberta), Anne-Marie Greene (Leicester), Damian Grimshaw (ILO), Christopher King (Texas at Austin), Janine Leschke (Copenhagen), Seamus McGuinness (ESRI), Kirsty Newsome (Sheffield), Peter Nolan (Leicester),  Jonathan Payne (De Montfort), Dean Stroud (Cardiff), Jill Rubery (Manchester), David Uzzell (Surrey), Maria-Luz Vega (ILO), Colin Williams (Sheffield), Alex Wood (Oxford), Ryuichi Yamakawa (Tokyo), Susan Yeandle (Sheffield).

 

Information about how to register can be found at:

http://management.sheffield.ac.uk/events/59751972759/

 

17th April 2019

EFES NEWSLETTER - APRIL 2019

Having trouble viewing this e-mail? This newsletter is also available in 7 languages (EN, FR, ES, DE, IT, CS, HU) on page
http://www.efesonline.org/EFES NEWS/2019/EFES NEWSLETTER - 4-2019 EN.htm

 

     Subscribe  /  Unsubscribe  /  Membership                                                       


EFES NEWSLETTER - APRIL 2019

New Record Year for Employee Share Ownership in Europe

JUST RELEASED

The new "Annual Economic Survey of Employee Share Ownership in European Countries" is just released
More information

 

in partnership with




New Record Year for Employee Share Ownership in Europe

New record year for employee share ownership in Europe, with nearly 400 billion Euro held by employees in their company or 3.11%.

More and more European companies are organizing employee share plans. In 2018, 87.3% of all large European companies had employee share plans of all kinds, while 52.3% had "broad-based" plans for all employees. Their number increased by 3 to 4% on average each year since 2006, a solid growth. The rise is back for the number of employee shareholders, with 7.5 million people in large European companies; if we add one million employee shareholders in SMEs, the total figure reaches 8.5 million.

However, the decline in the democratization rate of employee share ownership has still to be stopped.

Following the crisis, some European countries (including the UK) had chosen for stronger incentive policies, promoting employee share ownership and long term savings as an investment for the future. Instead of that, some other countries (including France) had chosen to reduce public spending and to support household consumption, while incentives for long term savings and for employee share ownership were sacrificed.

This had a strong impact on the democratization rate of employee share ownership in Europe (the proportion of employee shareholders amongst all employees), leading to a divorce between continental Europe and the UK. A sharp drop below 20% was observed on the continent. On the contrary, the democratization rate had risen to more than 25% in the UK.

After the negative phase from 2009 to 2013, policy decisions are positive again in most European countries. This led to a rebound of the democratization rate to 38% in France  following the "Macron Law", illustrating the high elasticity of employee share ownership to fiscal incentives.

However negative factors are still prevailing in some countries. Germany gives the picture of the dramatic impact of such policies on the democratization rate of employee share ownership, with less than 13%.

On the other hand, the UK and France are the only European countries showing a recent but significant positive dynamics of the majority-employee-owned sector. The number of such companies increased from 36 in the UK in 2014 to 80 in 2018, mainly due to the impact of the new Employee Ownership Trust scheme implemented in 2014. In France, it is mainly due to the multiplication of combined Management and Employee Buy-Outs.

Press Review
We have a selection of 22 remarkable articles in 8 countries in March 2019: Belgium, Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Poland, United Kingdom, USA.
Belgium: EASI is employee-owned and for the fifth time in a row "Best Place to Work".
Canada: Canadian government will cap the use of the preferential tax treatment on stock options.
France: How the new "Pacte Law" will impact employee share ownership and savings schemes. Employee share ownership for start-ups. First employee share plan for Iliad. New workers co-operative linked to rescue plans.
Germany: 300.000 employee shareholders for Siemens through free share awards.
Italy: First employee share plan for Generali.
Poland: New employee share plan for XTPL.
UK: British Airways unions call for the re-introduction of an employee share ownership scheme. New firms sold to Employee Ownership Trusts. John Lewis cuts staff bonuses to lowest level in 65 years.
USA: New companies sold to ESOPs. Colorado launches initiative to boost employee ownership of businesses, "looking to make Colorado the Delaware of employee ownership".

The full press review is available on:
              http://www.efesonline.org/PRESS REVIEW/2019/March.htm 

 


Your support

Why?
Amount in Euro:


A political roadmap for employee ownership in Europe

The EFES needs more members. Download the EFES membership form

What's new on the EFES website?

EFES NEWS distribution: 200.000






















































































































   With best regards

 

   
 

Marc Mathieu
Secretary General
EFES - EUROPEAN FEDERATION OF EMPLOYEE SHARE OWNERSHIP
FEAS - FEDERATION EUROPEENNE DE L'ACTIONNARIAT SALARIE
Avenue Voltaire 135, B-1030 Brussels
Tel: +32 (0)2 242 64 30 - Fax: +32 (0)2 791 96 00
E-mail: efes@efesonline.org
Web site: www.efesonline.org
EFES' objective is to act as the umbrella organization of employee owners, companies and all persons, trade unions, experts, researchers, institutions looking to promote employee share ownership and participation in Europe.


 

Feedback
 

17th April 2019

Next Manchester Industrial Relations Society meeting

Dear all

The next meeting of the Society, which is the Shirley Lerner Memorial Lecture will be Professor Damian Grimshaw, Director of the Research Department at the ILO who will be giving a presentation on The ILO and social justice at work: Reinvigorating its century-old mandate at 6pm on 16th May 2019.

Please find attached the flyer and a map of the venue.

We look forward to seeing you there.

 

Best wishes,

 

Stephen Mustchin

Secretary

Manchester Industrial Relations Society

17th April 2019

Visions of the workplace:

Visions of the workplace:

missing from the record

Britain at Work (B@W) 1945-95 in association with British Universities’ Industrial Relations (BUIRA) IR History Group and Oral History Society (OHS)

 

Saturday 11 May 2019, 11am – 16.450pm

University of Westminster, 35 Marylebone Road, London NW1 5LS

(opposite Madame Tussauds and nearly opposite Baker Street tube)

Room C279 (lunch C287)

 

For further details and to reserve a place, please email Michael Gold (m.gold@rhul.ac.uk) or Linda Clarke (clarkel@wmin.ac.uk)

This year’s, Britain at Work Oral Labour History Day, will focus on the visual and remembering, asking and answering questions about images of work and activism in film, photography and the theatre. Changing technology means that opportunities to record working lives are now available immediately and with the potential of greater democracy. In recent decades, some photographers and workers in film and theatre have pushed at the boundaries recording and disseminating, engaging directly with working people. In this year’s Oral Labour History Day, we are inviting people known for visualising the workplace and struggle to reflect on how their experience links to oral history. There will also be an accompanying exhibition, Cuban Notebook, by Larry Herman, photographer, on display.

 

B@W is an initiative to capture the memories of people at work between 1945 and 1995, many of which can be found at the TUC Library Collections held at London Metropolitan University, accessible at: (www.unionhistory.info/britainatwork)..

 

Programme

10.30-11.00

Registration/Coffee & Tea

Speaker

Chair

11.00-11.15

Welcome and introduction

Linda Clarke and Michael Gold

 

11.15-12.00

How seeing and hearing people adds to our multi layered understanding of history

Sarah Boston

Linda Clarke

12.00-13.00

Roundtable: brief contributions on participants’ current interest in oral labour history

Participants

Michael Gold

13.00-13.45

Lunch

13.45 – 15.00

Images of Work – photography

·         Showing and discussing the film ‘Clydeside 1974-1976’

·         The changing nature of photo-ops and Vox Pops

Larry Herman

 

Jeff Howarth

 

Nick Jones

15.00-15.15

Coffee/Tea break

15.15-16.30

 

 

Applying oral history: the role of theatre

Pam Schweitzer

 

Joanna Bornat

 

Susan Croft

16.30-16.45

Closing observations

Joanna Bornat

 


 

About the speakers:

 

Sarah Boston, award winning documentary film maker, author of the book Women Workers and Trade Unions and trade union member (ACTT/BECTU) since 1967, writes: “Over the decades I have interviewed people on film about their lives. The interviews have included women who had been chain makers in the 1910 strike (BBC 1976): the daughters in Dorothea Lange’s iconic photograph the migrant mother (C4 1989) and four women- Hortensia Allende; Joan Jara; Joyce Horman and Angela Jeira Bachelet - whose husbands were murdered by the Pinochet regime (2005 Fuse Films). Actually seeing and hearing people adds to our multi layered understanding of history. To illustrate. I will use short clips from the above documentaries.

 

Dr Susan Croft is Director of Unfinished Histories, a major initiative to record the history of Alternative Theatre in Britain through oral histories and to preserve archives of the alternative theatre movement from the 1960s to the 1980s (see www.unfinishedhistories.com). In 2013-14 she led the HLF-funded project Unfinished Histories Company Links, which culminated in the exhibition and publication Re-Staging Revolutions: Alternative Theatre in Lambeth and Camden 1968-88, as well as curating 15 accompanying events. From 1997-2005 Susan was Senior Curator (Contemporary Performance) at the V&A Theatre Museum, working on the National Video Archive of Performance and curating four major exhibitions. She also established a range of initiatives recording the history of Black and Asian theatre in Britain.

 

Nick Jones: After a career reporting industrial conflict, former BBC correspondent Nicholas Jones reflects on the changing nature of photo-ops and Vox Pops. More than ever workers in conflict understand that a picture tells the story. But are their voices being heard? Jones fears lazy journalism and editorial cuts are limiting the chances of working people to argue their case through the news media.

 

Pam Schweitzer has spent the last thirty years developing reminiscence arts work, especially original reminiscence theatre productions, professional and amateur. She founded the Age Exchange Theatre Trust and the Reminiscence Centre and was its Artistic Director from 1983 to 2005. She directs the European Reminiscence Network (1993 to the present), specialising in international reminiscence festivals and conferences, and co-ordinates Europe-wide projects on reminiscence in dementia care, receiving a Lifetime Achievement Award by the National Dementia Care Awards 2014. At the University of Greenwich, which awarded her an Honorary Doctorate in 2017, she is developing the Reminiscence Theatre Archive and Website as well as working with students on Reminiscence Theatre and Theatre-in-Education projects. Pam will talk about moving from recorded story into theatre, especially verbatim theatre based closely on interviewees' words. With the example of 'What did you do in the war, Mum?', a show, a book, an exhibition and a website, she will show how the writer, director and cast gather together the interview material and look for a structure to reflect and contain it, transforming it into a professional production seen by thousands on national and international tours. She will describe how students of drama today make original plays of their own from the same interview material recorded 40 years previous.

 

 

Larry Herman, photographer, originally from New York City, immigrated to Britain in 1968 during the Vietnam War. He is an activist in the National Union of Journalists and represents the NUJ on the Cuban Solidarity Campaign National Executive. He is on the organising committee of Britain@Work and is secretary of his tenants’ association in Whitechapel. Herman is currently documenting the struggle to organise an independent trade union in the clothing manufacturing industry in Dhaka, the Bangladesh capital. Streetlevel Photoworks, Glasgow, produced the film Clydeside 1974-1976 about Larry’s work,

About the Exhibition: First shown in a 2017 Mayday exhibition in Havana, Cuban Notebook is part of a larger portfolio in the permanent archive of the Confederacion de Trabajadores de Cubanos (CTC - Confederation of Cuban Workers). The photographs, made over a period of four years with the assistance of the CTC, document the working lives of Cubans. As Larry Herman, the photographer, explains: ‘Work defines who we are’.

 

 

17th April 2019

Register now for BUIRA 2019 confererence in Newcastle

Members are advised that registration is now open for the 2019 conference here and that accommodation can also now be booked through the following link here.

 

4th April 2019

Debating the Future of Work Hilton Hotel Sheffield, 28-29 May 2019

Debating the Future of Work

 

This two-day conference is being organised by the Centre for Decent Work (CDW) at the University of Sheffield in collaboration with the International Labour Organisation (ILO). The recent report by the ILO’s Global Commission on the Future of Work, which represents the culmination of the ILO’s centenary initiative on the future of work, describes ways in which the world of work might be improved. The conference will bring together leading academics and ILO officials to discuss issues raised by the report and other matters that are of central importance to the future of work and the future research agenda. The themes to be addressed will include:

  • Education, skills and lifelong learning;

  • New forms of employment and the future of social protection;

  • Diversity and inclusion;

  • Ageing, caring and wellbeing;

  • Work organisation, technology and job quality;

  • Governance, labour administration and social dialogue

  • Work and the environment;

  • The future research agenda.

 

The conference will feature invited contributions from researchers based at universities in various countries, including Australia, Canada, Denmark, Germany, Japan, the USA and UK, providing opportunities for international sharing of knowledge and experience and also network building.

Further information, including how to register, will be available soon.

2nd April 2019

BUIRA Member Conferred as Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences

BUIRA Member Conferred as Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences

 

The BUIRA Executive would like to offer their congratulations to Professor Mark Stuart, who this week was amongst the 73 leading social scientists conferred as Fellows of the Academy of Social Sciences (AcSS).  Professor Stuart is a member and former President of BUIRA, and, as the Fellowship recognises, he has made major contributions to research in employment relations and in social science more widely.

 

The full announcement made by the AcSS can be found here.

 

As a constituent learned society of the AcSS, BUIRA is able to make nominations for Fellowships.  The deadline for the next round of nominations is June 2019.  A call to all BUIRA members to propose nominees will be made in April, but anyone wishing to discuss a nomination informally before then should contact the BUIRA Treasurer, Stephen Procter (stephen.procter@newcastle.ac.uk).

 

1st April 2019

Call For Papers: Inequality and Organizations: Paper Development Masterclass for Early Career Academics and Doctoral Students

Call For Papers: Inequality and Organizations: Paper Development Masterclass for Early Career Academics and Doctoral Students

September 20th, 2019, The York Management School, University of York, UK

Inequality and social justice are long standing concerns in academic research and public policy, affecting individual and collective wellbeing, diminishing growth and productivity and undermining trust in key societal institutions. Organizations, their structures, practices and strategies act both as potential barriers and solutions to this.

This master class, supported by the Society for the Advancement of Management Studies in association with The York Management School’s Justice, Ethics and Inequality theme, invites papers of 7,000-10,000 words by 21st June 2019 looking at the relationship between inequality and organizations, their structures, practices and strategies.  Themes include but are not limited to: poverty, social mobility, diversity management, precarity, international inequality, corporate social responsibility, employee participation, and industrial democracy.

Participants will present their research to leading scholars in the field and receive detailed critique of their work as well as attending a faculty-led plenary session to provide guidance on researching and publishing work on inequality in world class management journals.  Panelists have editorial experience at leading journals including Academy of Management Review, Journal of Management Studies, Sociological Quarterly and Work, Employment and Society, as well as extensive publication, editorial board and peer reviewing experience.

Travel bursaries of up to £175 will be given to successful applicants, intended to include second class travel and hotel costs if necessary. There will also be an optional dinner in York on the 19th September.  York is a pleasant cathedral city in the north of England and well worth visiting, while the university campus is in a pleasant out of town location conducive to academic thought and discussion.

Please send any enquires as to suitability to Dr Kevin Tennent (kevin.tennent@york.ac.uk), Dr Joyce Jiang (joyce.jiang@york.ac.uk) or Professor Daniel Muzio (Daniel.muzio@york.ac.uk).

Decisions as to acceptance will be communicated by 31st July 2019.

Masters/Panelists:

Dr Louise Ashley (Royal Holloway)

Professor Penny Dick (University of Sheffield)

Professor Kevin Leicht (University of Illinois)

Professor Jacqueline O’ Reilly (University of Sussex)

Professor Ro Suddaby (University of Victoria and University of Liverpool)

 

Please send submissions and inquiries to: SAMSMasterClass2019@gmail.com

1st April 2019

Vacancy at UCD

For more information see:

http://www.ucd.ie/adastrafellows/

29th March 2019

BSA Early Career Regional Forum:

BSA Early Career Regional Forum: 

Theorising worker-employer relations in the new world of work  

4th April 2019, 9:00am-5:00pm

Provisional Programme

 

 

This event, sponsored by the British Sociological Association and the Centre for Employment Relations Innovation and Change (CERIC), University of Leeds: theorising worker-employer relations in the new world of work brings Early Career Researchers(ECRs) with leading academics to consider contemporary theoretical and empirical understandings of the worker-employer relationship. To see the provisional programme and register for this event, please click  here BSA Leeds ECR Forum 4th April 2019 Event Page  A small number of bursaries are available to support attendance. For further information, please contact the event organisers, Dr. Jo Cutter (j.cutter@leeds.ac.uk)  or Dr. Simon Joyce (s.joyce1@leeds.ac.uk).

 

 

29th March 2019

The Palgrave Handbook of Workers’ Participation at Plant Level Editors: Berger, Stefan, Pries, Ludger, Wannöffel, Manfred (Eds.)

  • An historical and comparative examination of plant-level workers' representations and models of social partnership 
  • Considers both European and non-European case studies, adding important insight on global trends
  • Suggests future directions for sustainable and long-term innovation and growth in the knowledge era.

 

Comprising the study, documentation, and comparison of plant-level workers’ participation around the world, this volume meets the challenge of offering a global perspective on workers’ participation, representation, and models of social partnership. Value chains, economic life, inter-cultural exchange and knowledge, as well as the mobility of persons and ideas increasingly cross the borders of nation-states. In the knowledge age, the active participation of workers in organizations is crucially important for sustainable and long-term growth and innovation. This handbook offers lessons from historical, global accounts of workers’ participation at plant level, even as it looks forward to predict forthcoming trends in participation.

https://www.palgrave.com/gb/book/9781137481917

 

29th March 2019

In Place of Strife (1969): Trade Union legal rights & responsibilities revisited

 

The Trade Union and Employment Forum would like to invite you to an upcoming all-day conference:

 

In Place of Strife (1969): Trade Union legal rights & responsibilities revisited

Saturday 27 April 2019, 11am-4pm

Modern Records Centre, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL

Fifty years ago, the conflict between the Harold Wilson Labour Government and the trade unions over Secretary of State for Employment Barbara Castle’s White Paper In Place of Strife was one of the pivotal moments of post-war British Industrial Relations. It pitched voluntarist ideas of ‘free collective bargaining’ against ideas of economic planning and public policy concerns about strikes, inflation and restrictive practices. The white paper followed the 1968 Donovan Report and preceded Heath’s Conservative 1971 Industrial Relations Act.

In response to Peter Dorey’s new book on ‘In Place of Strife’, this day has two parts. In the morning there is a historical reassessment of the political episode. In the afternoon, we consider the implications for current Labour Party policy on trade unions, as the Manifesto promises to ‘roll out sectoral bargaining’. The seminar is held at the Modern Records Centre, the largest UK trade union and industrial relations collection, which will also be introduced to us.

Speakers include:

Professor Peter Dorey, Professor of British Politics at Cardiff University and author of Comrades in Conflict: Labour, the Trade Unions and In Place of Strife (2019)

Dr David Lyddon, founding editor of the journal Historical Studies in Industrial Relations

Lisa Martineau, journalist and author of Politics & Power: Barbara Castle, a biography (2011)

Joe Dromey, Deputy Director of the Learning and Work Institute and author (at IPPR) of Power to the People: how stronger unions can deliver economic justice (IPPR 2018)

Professor Peter Ackers, co-editor (with Dr Alastair Reid) of Alternatives to State-Socialism: Other Worlds of Labour in the Twentieth Century (Palgrave 2016)

 

Refreshments are provided and the cost is £12 – to register and pay please sign up on Eventbrite

Kind regards

History & Policy

 

14th March 2019

Norwich Business School University of East Anglia Lecturer in Human Resource Management (ATS856)

Faculty of Social Sciences

Norwich Business School  University of East Anglia

 

Lecturer in Human Resource Management (ATS856)

 

Lecturer: £42,036 to £48,677 per annum

 

Norwich Business School is home to a vibrant, diverse, and engaged academic community, ranked amongst the top 10 UK business schools by the quality of its research output (REF 2014), and intent on providing teaching excellence across its wide range of business and management degree programmes in supporting UEA’s award of TEF Gold status. 

 

The School is seeking to recruit an outstanding Lecturer in the field of Human Resource Management (HRM) to join the Employment Systems and Institutions (ESI) group. The group has expertise in HRM, work psychology and labour economics with teaching and research activities that focus on explaining the individual, community and societal impacts of work and employment practice. A full list of areas of interest can be found in the further particulars.

 

The post is available following ‘Academic Teaching & Scholarship’ (ATS) terms and conditions. ATS staff are expected to provide a leadership contribution to teaching and administration while maintaining subject scholarship but without the requirement to conduct research.  

 

A good first degree or an equivalent qualification is essential; and PhD (or nearing completion), or equivalent experience – this could mean substantial experience at a high level in the sector, and/or equivalent professional qualification. Applicants must satisfy all the essential criteria detailed in the person specification.  

 

The post is available from 20 May 2019 on a full-time indefinite basis.

https://myview.uea.ac.uk/webrecruitment/pages/vacancy.jsf?search=10

 

 

Closing date: 3 April 2019.

 

Any questions or queries please contact Dr Susan Sayce    email s.sayce@uea.ac.uk

 

 

Dr Susan Sayce

Norwich Business School

Thomas Paine Study Centre Room 2.14

University of East Anglia

Norwich Research Park

Norwich NR4 7TJ


Tel: 01603 591286

Email:
s.sayce@uea.ac.uk

 

On the Editorial board for Interdisciplinary perspectives on equality and diversity : An international journal,  an open access journal

 

cid:BBD3E578-AEC1-42AF-A718-2381FE5EA87C

Gold (Teaching Excellence Framework 2017)

UK Top 15 (The Times/Sunday Times 2017 and Complete University Guide 2018)

World Top 200 (Times Higher Education World University Rankings 2017)

Top 5 for student satisfaction (National Student Survey 2005-2017. Overall student satisfaction, English mainstream universities)

 

TEF Gold logo RGB  facebook  twitter-old tumblr flickr linkedin youtube cid:image008.png@01CF8BB5.50024060

 

 

14th March 2019

EFES NEWSLETTER - MARCH 2019

Having trouble viewing this e-mail? This newsletter is also available in 7 languages (EN, FR, ES, DE, IT, CS, HU) on page
http://www.efesonline.org/EFES NEWS/2019/EFES NEWSLETTER - 3-2019 EN.htm

 

     Subscribe  /  Unsubscribe  /  Membership                                                       


EFES NEWSLETTER - MARCH 2019

Congratulations from the Irish Parliament

The Irish Parliament likes this newsletter, he let us know by letter.
Every month, this newsletter highlights the significant facts of employee share ownership worldwide, as well as European policies.
The monthly press review is a fabulous source of information. It sheds light on proven facts and helps sort out fake news, delivering a story full of novelties and twists.
The progress and benefits of employee share ownership are becoming more and more evident.

Letter from the Irish Parliament

Press review
We have a selection of 21 remarkable articles in 5 countries in February 2019: France, Ireland, South Africa, United Kingdom, USA.
France: Employee share ownership is spreading in Intermediate Size Businesses. The coming "Pacte Law" will fail to provide employee shareholders with financial advisory solutions. New employee share plan for Total, for Schneider Electric. Employee buy-outs for Securimut, for Handi-Wagala.
Ireland: Fears grow over Brexit threat to Irish staff share schemes.
South Africa: The ANC's election manifesto endorses employee share ownership.
UK: British Airways unions call for the re-introduction of an employee share ownership scheme. New Employee Ownership Trusts for Wales' leading TV production company.
USA: ESOPs increase optionality for business owners. Publix supermarket is the largest employee-owned company in the world. Allowing employees to own company shares is a powerful retention tool. 

The full press review is available on:
              http://www.efesonline.org/PRESS REVIEW/2019/February.htm 

 


Your support

Why?
Amount in Euro:


A political roadmap for employee ownership in Europe

The EFES needs more members. Download the EFES membership form

What's new on the EFES website?

EFES NEWS distribution: 200.000













   With best regards

 

   
 

Marc Mathieu
Secretary General
EFES - EUROPEAN FEDERATION OF EMPLOYEE SHARE OWNERSHIP
FEAS - FEDERATION EUROPEENNE DE L'ACTIONNARIAT SALARIE
Avenue Voltaire 135, B-1030 Brussels
Tel: +32 (0)2 242 64 30 - Fax: +32 (0)2 791 96 00
E-mail: efes@efesonline.org
Web site: www.efesonline.org
EFES' objective is to act as the umbrella organization of employee owners, companies and all persons, trade unions, experts, researchers, institutions looking to promote employee share ownership and participation in Europe.

 

14th March 2019

Call for Papers: "Politicizing and Depoliticizing Work in the Contemporary Firm and Beyond" Deadline for submission: April 20, 2019.

Call for Papers: "Politicizing and Depoliticizing Work in the Contemporary Firm and Beyond"
Deadline for submission: April 20, 2019.

Congress of the Swiss Sociological Association 2019
The Future of Work, September 10-12, 2019
The employment relation that emerged after World War II has undergone significant transformations in the present context of deep socioeconomical changes (transnationalization of capital, economic crisis, digitalization, etc.). Phenomena such as job precariousness, difficult working conditions and the increasing number of working poor become more relevant. In addition to this, the spatio-temporal boundaries between professional and private life are increasingly blurred. These challenges are sometimes tackled via individual arrangements, e.g. about the working time, in such cases a "depoliticizing" of work can be observed. However, counter-processes of "politicization" are also taking place in case of reactions - such as resistances or mobilizations - aimed to negotiated more broadly and collectively the issues linked with the employment relation. Those reactions can involve new actors and their scope depends on the country and/or the economic sector. This workshop questions the extent of such politicizing and depoliticizing processes in order to grasp their size, the issues and the involved actors. The workshop will be structured around three axes.

Axis 1: Are trade-unions and employers' organizations still the main sources of politicization in the world of work?

For a long time, collective bargaining between trade-unions and employers' organizations framed the politicizing process of the world of work. Several legitimate actors were involved in this process: trade-unions and employee representative committees, business corporations and employers' organizations as well as the state in the frame of tripartite bodies. Nonetheless, the devolution of collective bargaining at firm-level and the emergence of new and less unionized economic sectors seem to undermine the traditional employment relation. What dynamics are going on in terms of politicising and depoliticising work and employment relations at firm and sector level? Do the trade-unions and the employers' organizations still play a major role in those processes? Is the state playing a new part in the employment relation?

Axis 2: What kind of politicization of work take place in a globalized economy?

The employment relation takes place increasingly at the international level in the frame of a new international division of labour. The multinational and transnational companies active in Global Value Chains (GVC) seem to have increased impact on the creation of jobs and the definition of working conditions. This implies a disconnection between such companies and the established actors of the employment relation which are based mainly at local and national level. In which way does the internationalization of the labour process transform the traditional forms of collective bargaining? How can a politicizing of work take place when the production is internationalized?

Axis 3: Which mobilizations can lead to a repolitization of work?

When individual arrangements do not longer allow a balanced employment relation (i.e. possibility to combine individual needs and the requirements of the production), tensions can emerge in the frame of the labour process. These tensions can lead the actors to mobilize themselves collectively or individually for changing the balance of power between actors inside the firms, but also beyond them. Which mobilizations lead to a repolitization of work? Are the firms still the main places of those struggles? Are new actors and spaces emerging?

This call is related to the workshop "Politicizing and Depoliticizing Work in the Contemporary Firm and Beyond" that is organized by Jean-Michel Bonvin, Nicola Cianferoni and Aris Martinelli (University of Geneva). Accepted languages for proposals are English and French. A publication may be considered according to the communications. Applicants must send their abstracts with their name, affiliation, and contact information in the message. The maximum length is 2000 characters (including spaces) and the deadline for submission is April 20, 2019. Please send your proposal to: nicola.cianferoni[at]unige.ch.
Feedback
 

14th March 2019

Call for Papers : Theorising worker-employer relations in the new world of work: BSA Early Career Researcher (ECR) Forum

Call for Papers : Theorising worker-employer relations in the new world of work: BSA Early Career Researcher (ECR) Forum

4th April 2019, Leeds University Business School

Call For Papers & Registration /bsa-early-career-forum-regional-event-theorising-worker-employer-relations-in-the-new-world-of-work/

Please not you do not have to be presenting to attend but please do register.

This event provides an opportunity for ECRs to share their work with leading academics and other researchers investigating collective interest representation and documenting novel and unexpected forms of collective action that shape worker-employer relations.  The event will also explore the scope for collaboration to develop research agendas that could advance theoretical and empirical understanding in this area, to consider what, if anything, has emerged to replace formal bargaining institutions between workers and management and how this could be theorised.  Confirmed keynote speakers:

·         Professor Miguel Martinez Lucio, University of Manchester

·         Professor Sian Moore, University of Greenwich

·         Professor Mark Stuart, University of Leeds

 

If you have any questions about the ECR Forum event please contact either Dr Jo Cutter (j.cutter@leeds.ac.uk ) or Dr Simon Joyce (S.Joyce1@leeds.ac.uk )

Deadline for abstracts extended to 22nd  March 2019 (please us the BSA link above) with notifications by 25th March

Deadline for registrations Thursday 28th March 2019

Feedback
 

14th March 2019

Labour and Industry: A journal of the social and economic relations of work Special Issue: Call for Papers

Labour and Industry: A journal of the social and economic relations of work

Special Issue: Call for Papers

Geographical labour mobility in the construction sector: Contexts, Patterns, Processes, and Consequences

 
Guest Editors

Lachlan Barber, Department of Geography, Hong Kong Baptist University

Michael Haan, Department of Sociology, Western University, Ontario

Barbara Neis, Department of Sociology, Memorial University of Newfoundland

Nicole Power, Department of Sociology, Memorial University of Newfoundland

Overview of Special Issue

The construction industry is one of the largest industries globally. It is extremely diverse, encompassing craft, professional and industrial services related to the building, demolition, renovation and maintenance of civil, industrial, residential and commercial built environments. Various forms of employment-related geographical mobility (E-RGM) or labour (im)mobilities are intrinsic to construction work. Despite the opportunities the construction industry presents for understanding the relationship between E-RGM and work, the patterns and dynamics of E-RGM, and their intersections with labour markets, work scheduling, family, community and the larger political economy are underexplored. This is the case despite the size of the construction sector and its association with large public investments in state-commissioned projects and thus, related policy interest. The proposed special issue seeks to address this gap.

 

We seek papers that shed light on the complex interrelationships between construction (in its different forms), diverse patterns of E-RGM and their intersections with work, family labour markets and community. Topics could include, but are not limited to understanding:

  • how the construction industry and collective bargaining enable and regulate mobile work and mobile workers in different contexts;
  • the relationship between mobility and health and safety, including wellbeing and work-life balance;
  • the relationship between mobility and the application and enforcement of labour standards in construction;
  • changes over time in industry mobility regimes and their consequences for labour force composition and labour relations;
  • the implications of work mobility for families and communities in the construction industry.

 

We also welcome enquiries relating to other topics that look at the intersectionality of mobility, labour, industry and built environments.

 

Key Dates:

Expression of interest, including titles and abstracts, to the co-editors by: 15th April, 2019

Submit your paper via the journal website by 1st September, 2019

Papers finalised and sent to the publisher 1st March, 2019

Publication of the special issue expected in May, 2020

 

Notes for Prospective Authors

Please contact Michael Haan, Guest Editor, if you any questions about the special issue at mhaan2@uwo.ca. For any queries regarding the submission process please contact the journal’s Systems Manager, Jane Halteh at jane.halteh@gmail.com.

Papers submitted to Labour and Industry are managed using an online submission and review system with Editorial Manager http://www.edmgr.com/rlab/default.aspx. Please check the website for formatting requirements for submissions.

Authors should first register with Editorial Manager and when submitting their papers they should ensure all the author and co-author details are entered correctly. Any authors or co-authors who have previously submitted a paper to Labour and Industry, or reviewed a paper, should already be registered in the system, but they should check their details.

 

Labour and Industry is the journal of the Association of Industrial Relations Academics of Australia and New Zealand (AIRAANZ). It is published by Taylor and Francis and accredited by the Chartered ABS Academic Journal Guide (‘2’) and ABDC rankings (‘B’).

 

 

Labour and Industry: A journal of the social and economic relations of work

Special Issue: Call for Papers

Geographical labour mobility in the construction sector: Contexts, Patterns, Processes, and Consequences

 
Guest Editors

Lachlan Barber, Department of Geography, Hong Kong Baptist University

Michael Haan, Department of Sociology, Western University, Ontario

Barbara Neis, Department of Sociology, Memorial University of Newfoundland

Nicole Power, Department of Sociology, Memorial University of Newfoundland

Overview of Special Issue

The construction industry is one of the largest industries globally. It is extremely diverse, encompassing craft, professional and industrial services related to the building, demolition, renovation and maintenance of civil, industrial, residential and commercial built environments. Various forms of employment-related geographical mobility (E-RGM) or labour (im)mobilities are intrinsic to construction work. Despite the opportunities the construction industry presents for understanding the relationship between E-RGM and work, the patterns and dynamics of E-RGM, and their intersections with labour markets, work scheduling, family, community and the larger political economy are underexplored. This is the case despite the size of the construction sector and its association with large public investments in state-commissioned projects and thus, related policy interest. The proposed special issue seeks to address this gap.

 

We seek papers that shed light on the complex interrelationships between construction (in its different forms), diverse patterns of E-RGM and their intersections with work, family labour markets and community. Topics could include, but are not limited to understanding:

  • how the construction industry and collective bargaining enable and regulate mobile work and mobile workers in different contexts;
  • the relationship between mobility and health and safety, including wellbeing and work-life balance;
  • the relationship between mobility and the application and enforcement of labour standards in construction;
  • changes over time in industry mobility regimes and their consequences for labour force composition and labour relations;
  • the implications of work mobility for families and communities in the construction industry.

 

We also welcome enquiries relating to other topics that look at the intersectionality of mobility, labour, industry and built environments.

 

Key Dates:

Expression of interest, including titles and abstracts, to the co-editors by: 15th April, 2019

Submit your paper via the journal website by 1st September, 2019

Papers finalised and sent to the publisher 1st March, 2019

Publication of the special issue expected in May, 2020

 

Notes for Prospective Authors

Please contact Michael Haan, Guest Editor, if you any questions about the special issue at mhaan2@uwo.ca. For any queries regarding the submission process please contact the journal’s Systems Manager, Jane Halteh at jane.halteh@gmail.com.

Papers submitted to Labour and Industry are managed using an online submission and review system with Editorial Manager http://www.edmgr.com/rlab/default.aspx. Please check the website for formatting requirements for submissions.

Authors should first register with Editorial Manager and when submitting their papers they should ensure all the author and co-author details are entered correctly. Any authors or co-authors who have previously submitted a paper to Labour and Industry, or reviewed a paper, should already be registered in the system, but they should check their details.

 

Labour and Industry is the journal of the Association of Industrial Relations Academics of Australia and New Zealand (AIRAANZ). It is published by Taylor and Francis and accredited by the Chartered ABS Academic Journal Guide (‘2’) and ABDC rankings (‘B’).

 

 

14th March 2019

IREC 2019

he 2019 IREC conference will be held on 2-3 September at the University of Bielefeld, with the theme ‘Transnational Labour Markets and Industrial Relations’.
The date is immediately before the ILERA European conference in Düsseldorf, which is a 2-hour train ride from Bielefeld.
Details at:
http://uni-bielefeld.de/soz/industrial-relations-in-europe-irec-2019/

8th March 2019

Public Sector Pay and Employment

Public Sector Pay and Employment

The Centre for Research in Employment and Work (CREW) is holding a symposium on Public Sector Pay and Employment on Wed 20th March 2019 from 1-6 pm at Hamilton House, The University of Greenwich.

This seminar comes at a critical time for the public sector.

SEMINAR:

After nearly a decade of pay restraint in the UK public sector, pay settlements are now being reached at higher levels than the previous 1% limit. The Government has tried to restrict the first post-cap increases, but faced with recruitment and retention difficulties, especially in the NHS, in schools and elsewhere, there are upward pressures that cannot be ignored. This symposium will examine aspects of Government Policy, employee relations and pay and reward strategies in the context of a post-1% world. It will examine pay rises, progression pay, staff shortages and skill requirements across large parts of the public sector.

This symposium brings together a strong range of speakers with expertise on how pay decisions are made and the pressures experienced by negotiators, and key issues related to reward and to the current and future skill requirements in the public sector.

Speakers:
Ken Mulkearn, Director, Incomes Data Research – ‘Pay developments in the public and private sectors 2018/19’.
Nicola Allison, Remuneration adviser to the Office of Manpower Economics – ‘Pay developments in the Pay Review Body world and evidence-based research’.
David Powell, Lead Officer, Pay Policy and Negotiations for the National Education Union – ‘Pay and progression for teachers in schools and academies’.
Paul Wallace, Director of Employment Relations and Reward for the NHS Employers – ‘The current three-year pay agreement and the skill and people requirements of the NHS’.
Simon Pannell, Principal Adviser (Employment and Negotiations) Local Government Association – ‘Pay and skill requirements in local government’.
Professor Ian Kessler, Kings College, London – ‘Reward and skill requirements into the 2020s’.

Chaired by Alastair Hatchett Visiting Fellow, CREW, University of Greenwich. Alastair was previously Head of Pay Services at Incomes Data Services.

 

Here is the link for more details: https://werugreenwich.wordpress.com/2019/01/22/symposium-on-public-sector-pay-and-employment/

 

 

 

Dr. Ruth Ballardie

Senior Lecturer

Department of Human Resources & Organisational Behaviour

University of Greenwich

 

Telephone: +44(020) 8331 9896 | E-mail: R.T.Ballardie@greenwich.ac.uk

 

Office hours for student consultation: Tuesdays 12:30 – 14:30 (during term time)

Location: QA106

 

 

University of Greenwich, a charity and company limited by guarantee, registered in England (reg. no. 986729). Registered office: Old Royal Naval College, Park Row, Greenwich, London SE10 9LS.
Feedback
 

8th March 2019

ILERA announcement – 5 March 2019

 

ILERA announcement – 5 March 2019

Starting 19 March 2019 Thomas Kochan, a previous ILERA President, and his colleague Elisabeth Reynolds will offer their online course on Shaping Work of the Future in conjunction with the MIT Task Force on Work of the Future and in partnership with the ILO’s Future of Work project and similar groups studying these issues from around the world. 

 

Tom, Elisabeth, and their team invite all who share an interest in this vital issue to join the course.  It is free and open to all around the world.  You can register for it here.

 

The goal of the course is to explore and develop plans of action for improving the job and career opportunities for today and tomorrow’s workforce. It also helps students understand and better address the deep divisions and inequalities in societies that threaten the future of our economies and democracies. The course will allow for individuals from all across the globe to create a better future by building a stronger network of businesses, employees, labor organizations, and their communities.  And this year we give special attention to how advancing technologies (AI, Machine Learning, Robotics, etc.) can be used to benefit all—by augmenting worker skills and by sharing the gains from technological and economic growth in equitable ways.

 

“We use the metaphor of “Building a New Social Contract” to organize the task we face and the options we might consider, while shaping the future trajectory of employment. Together we will learn how business, education, labor, government, and the workforce can work together to produce more good jobs and careers, thriving businesses and economies and in doing so help to close the deep divisions and address the frustrations that are all too apparent in our society.”

 

“We would like to invite you, your colleagues, and your students to take part in the class. In order to get a better sense of the course layout, you can watch the introduction piece here. If you have any further questions, please feel free to reach out to us. We would love to have you all on board.”

 

Thomas A. Kochan and Elisabeth R. Reynolds, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

 

 

Shaping the Future of Work

 

Explore ways to improve job opportunities and develop a personal plan for lifelong career success.

 

 

 

 

                                     Introduction video

 

 

This Spring Thomas Kochan, previous ILERA President will offer his free eight-week online course, 15.662x:

Thomas Kochan and 15.662x Course Team

 

What you'll learn

 

•A historical perspective and overview of work and employment policy in the United States and around the world

•How the roles of firms, employees, and public policy have changed and created the labor market we see today

•The status of the current labor market in more detail: What does it look like? What types of jobs do we have, and what skills are required? What are emerging trends in how firms organize work, and in the role of labor market institutions such as unions?

•How globalization and advancing technologies will change the way we work, which jobs could be eliminated and which jobs could be created in their place. How we might influence the way technology is designed and used to improve the quality of work.

•Resources and tools you can use to plan your own career paths in the workplaces of the future – those of the next generation.

 

·         Length:  8 weeks

·         Effort:  4-5 hours per week

·         Price:  Free

·         Add a Verified Certificate for $49 

·         Institution:  MITx

·         Subject:   Business & Management  

·         Level:  Introductory

·         Language:  English 

·         Video Transcripts:  English

 

Starts on 19 March 2019

 

www.ilo.org/ilera

 

-----------------------------------------
This electronic message may contain confidential, proprietary or privileged information intended solely for the use of the named recipient. The ILO is not liable for any error or virus connected with this transmission.
-----------------------------------------
Ce message électronique peut contenir des informations confidentielles, ou spécialement protégées, à la seule intention du destinataire. L'OIT ne peut être tenue responsable des erreurs ou des virus qui s'y trouveraient.
-----------------------------------------
Este mensaje electrónico puede contener información confidencial o especialmente protegida para el uso exclusivo del destinatario indicado. La OIT no se responsabiliza en caso de error o virus.
-----------------------------------------
Feedback
 

8th March 2019

Seminar on Public Sector Pay and Employment

Public Sector Pay and Employment

The Centre for Research in Employment and Work (CREW) is holding a symposium on Public Sector Pay and Employment on Wed 20th March 2019 from 1-6 pm at Hamilton House, The University of Greenwich.

This seminar comes at a critical time for the public sector.

SEMINAR:

After nearly a decade of pay restraint in the UK public sector, pay settlements are now being reached at higher levels than the previous 1% limit. The Government has tried to restrict the first post-cap increases, but faced with recruitment and retention difficulties, especially in the NHS, in schools and elsewhere, there are upward pressures that cannot be ignored. This symposium will examine aspects of Government Policy, employee relations and pay and reward strategies in the context of a post-1% world. It will examine pay rises, progression pay, staff shortages and skill requirements across large parts of the public sector.

This symposium brings together a strong range of speakers with expertise on how pay decisions are made and the pressures experienced by negotiators, and key issues related to reward and to the current and future skill requirements in the public sector.

Speakers:
Ken Mulkearn, Director, Incomes Data Research – ‘Pay developments in the public and private sectors 2018/19’.
Nicola Allison, Remuneration adviser to the Office of Manpower Economics – ‘Pay developments in the Pay Review Body world and evidence-based research’.
David Powell, Lead Officer, Pay Policy and Negotiations for the National Education Union – ‘Pay and progression for teachers in schools and academies’.
Paul Wallace, Director of Employment Relations and Reward for the NHS Employers – ‘The current three-year pay agreement and the skill and people requirements of the NHS’.
Simon Pannell, Principal Adviser (Employment and Negotiations) Local Government Association – ‘Pay and skill requirements in local government’.
Professor Ian Kessler, Kings College, London – ‘Reward and skill requirements into the 2020s’.

Chaired by Alastair Hatchett Visiting Fellow, CREW, University of Greenwich. Alastair was previously Head of Pay Services at Incomes Data Services.

21st February 2019

Title Call for Papers : theorising worker-employer relations in the new world of work

Theorising worker-employer relations in the new world of work: BSA Early Career Researcher (ECR) Forum

4th April 2019, Leeds University Business School

Call For Papers & Registration /bsa-early-career-forum-regional-event-theorising-worker-employer-relations-in-the-new-world-of-work/

This event provides an opportunity for ECRs to share their work with leading academics and other researchers investigating collective interest representation and documenting novel and unexpected forms of collective action that shape worker-employer relations.  The event will also explore the scope for collaboration to develop research agendas that could advance theoretical and empirical understanding in this area, to consider what, if anything, has emerged to replace formal bargaining institutions between workers and management and how this could be theorised.  Confirmed keynote speakers:

·         Professor Miguel Martinez Lucio, University of Manchester

·         Professor Sian Moore, University of Greenwich

·         Professor Mark Stuart, University of Leeds

 

If you have any questions about the ECR Forum event please contact either Dr Jo Cutter (j.cutter@leeds.ac.uk ) or Dr Simon Joyce (S.Joyce1@leeds.ac.uk )

Deadline for abstracts 7th March 2019 (please us the BSA link above)

_____________________________________________________

 

 

Best wishes

Jo

 

Dr Jo Cutter AFHEA

Lecturer in Work and Employment Relations

Centre for Employment Relations Innovation and Change

Leeds University Business School

+44 113 343 0202

https://business.leeds.ac.uk/jo-cutter/

Recent article: 

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/1468-2427.12607

cid:image001.png@01D2C9AE.0C745A10

21st February 2019

BUIRA History of Industrial Relations Study Group

Women and Trade Unions

Tuesday 26 March 2019, 3.00pm for 3.20-5.00pm (Tea/ coffee from 3.00)

Room XXX, University of Westminster, 35 Marylebone Road, London NW1 5LS (opposite Madame Tussauds and nearly opposite Baker Street tube)

 

For further details or to reserve a place, please email Michael Gold (m.gold@rhul.ac.uk) or Linda Clarke (clarkel@wmin.ac.uk).

 

Programme:

 

3.00-3.20pm: Tea/ coffee/ refreshments

3.20-3.30: Welcome: Michael Gold and Linda Clarke (Chairs)

 

3.30-4.00: Nicole Busby and Rebecca Zahn

A Feminist Challenge to the Trade Union Movement

This presentation examines the characteristics of non-standard employment arrangements and work in the gig economy against a historical understanding of the ‘feminisation of work’. It argues that unions prioritise functions they adopt within the labour market and the labour law system, a process based on a gendered understanding of employment that has long limited their ability to respond adequately to women workers. It concludes by considering lessons that could be learned by ‘traditional’ trade unions to broaden their appeal to those working under non-standard arrangements within and beyond the gig economy.

 

4.00-4.30: Helen McCarthy

Working Mothers and Workplace Activism in Modern Britain

Since the earliest days of industrialisation in Britain, women's relationship with the trade union movement has been an uneasy one. It was commonly assumed that women lacked a strong commitment to paid work and were difficult to organise due to their frequently interrupted employment histories and domestic ties. From the 1880s, a new generation of female trade unionists challenged these assumptions, but wage-earning wives and mothers remained a 'problem' group in the eyes of union leaders and labour intellectuals well into the later twentieth century. This presentation explores the character of workplace activism amongst this group, who made up an increasing proportion of the female workforce from the 1940s, asking how well trade unions adapted to this changing workforce and how far they were willing to advocate for the particular needs of working mothers, most notably around childcare, maternity rights and part-time employment.

 

4.30-5.00pm: General discussion

5.00pm: Close (followed by drinks until 5.30pm)
 

The speakers:

Nicole Busby is Professor of Labour Law at the University of Strathclyde, teaching and researching in the areas of Labour and Employment Law, Discrimination Law and European Social Law and Policy. She is a member of the Equality and Human Rights Commission's Scotland Committee.

Helen McCarthy is Lecturer in Modern British History at St John's College, University of Cambridge. She is the author of two books: The British People and the League of Nations: Democracy, Citizenship and Internationalism, 1918-1945 (Manchester University Press, 2011), and Women of the World: The Rise of the Female Diplomat (Bloomsbury, 2014) and she is currently completing a third, entitled Double Lives: A History of Working Motherhood in Modern Britain (Bloomsbury, 2021). Helen is Managing Editor of the journal Twentieth Century British History, and tweets @HistorianHelen

Rebecca Zahn is Senior Lecturer at the University of Strathclyde. She researches in the field of labour law (national, European and comparative), with a particular focus on collective labour law. She is the author of New Labour Laws in Old Member States (CUP, 2017) and is currently working on a number of historical labour law projects.

21st February 2019

Employee voice from different perspectives

Employee voice from different perspectives

Professor Jimmy Donaghey Professor John Blenkinsopp Professor Kate Kenny Dr Rea Prouska Dr Stewart Johnstone Dr Sarah Brooks
 

This workshop will introduce participants to a range of diverse perspectives from which voice and silence in organisations can be understood whilst acting as the inaugural event for the voice and silence community (VSC). An understanding of what encourages employees to voice is a fundamental concern for the HR professional and operational manager, yet preoccupations remain over how organisations can create conditions conducive to voice. Voice and silence scholars have traditionally focused on the role of the individual and the manager as main influences over voice and silence, yet contextual factors, as well as different types of voice have been shown to be highly influential. In the morning, the workshop will explore a number of contextual influences such as economic austerity, the presence of trade unions, the formality of voice mechanisms, and managerial processes. In the afternoon we will focus on one particular and topical form of voice, whistleblowing. To finalise the day, a workshop activity will discuss next steps for the voice and silence community, including subsequent events and collaborative opportunities.

Wednesday 6th March 9.30am - 4.30pm

This workshop will be of interest to scholars in the field of voice and silence as well as practitioners interested in how to harness the power of employees’ voices

Benefits of Attendance

• Increased awareness of diverse influences over voice and silence 
• Networking opportunity 
• Discussion around collaborations and subsequent events

Sheffield University Management School
Middleton Lecture Theatre

Conduit Road
Sheffield
S10 1FL

BAM Organisational Psychology SIG

Professor Jimmy Donaghey
Professor John Blenkinsopp
Professor Kate Kenny
Dr Rea Prouska
Dr Stewart Johnstone
Dr Sarah Brooks

For more information about this event, please contact Sarah Brooks: s.brooks@sheffield.ac.uk

For general enquires, please contact Linh Dang at the BAM Office at eventsofficer@bam.ac.uk, or on 02073837770

Students £15
BAM members £20
Non-BAM members £35

Registration Deadline: 5th March 2019

7th February 2019

PhD Scholarship: Digitalisation and the Future of Work: Platforms, Networks, and Workers

PhD Scholarship: Digitalisation and the Future of Work: Platforms, Networks, and Workers

 

This PhD scholarship offers three years’ funding, including tuition fees and a stipend of approximately £15,000 per year for candidates wishing to commence their studies in September 2019. The successful candidate will also receive a generous research support and conference allowance. You will also have access to a robust doctoral research training programme, dedicated research resources, training in transferable skills, visiting speaker seminar programme, and associate with existing research centres and groups.

The Project

The gig economy and platform-based working is increasingly being debated as an illustration of the impact of technology on the future world of work. This project will investigate platform-based working as a form of work organisation and investigate working practices and experiences. The focus will be on the under-researched area of intermediary firms, who have emerged to provide a bridge between workers and clients, filtering work requests to the platform. These emerging networks create long supply chains, many of which contain the features of fragmented and globally dispersed production. The research will adopt a case study approach to enable an in-depth exploration of the key issues. Research will involve the network itself as well as the experiences of workers in order to study the interaction and complex links between the two. Detailed research will enable an appreciation of the complex social units in terms of organising and operational principles, governance issues, power and social relations, and working conditions.

The candidate will be supervised from within the Work and Equalities Institute (WEI), alongside the Institute’s broader research interests concerning the future of work.

31st January 2019

Title: Event: 150 Years of the Trades Union Congress: The Future of Work and the Future of Unions

Title: Event: 150 Years of the Trades Union Congress: The Future of Work and the Future of Unions

 

On Monday 11th February, we are holding an event to launch of a special issue of Employee Relations co-edited by Dr. Andy Hodder (University of Birmingham) and Paul Nowak (Deputy General Secretary, TUC). The special issue of the journal reflects on 150 years of the Trades Union Congress (TUC) and examines the challenges facing trade union movements today.

 

A roundtable of key academic figures in the field of industrial relations will consider: the relationship between the decline in collective bargaining and the rise in wage inequality; the UK’s productivity problem and the extent to which this may be resolved through the introduction of the new technologies of artificial intelligence; various new forms of institutional experimentation to regulate the employment relationship and strengthen employment protections; the TUC’s efforts to embed organising in the trade union movement.

 

The event will include a drinks reception and a question and answer session.

 

Location

Alan Walters Building: 223 Harvard Theatre, Harvard Lecture Theatre

Date

Monday 11th February 2019 (18:00-20:00)

 

For more information and to register, see here: https://www.birmingham.ac.uk/schools/business/events/2019/01/the-future-of-work-and-the-future-of-unions.aspx

31st January 2019

Public Sector Pay and Employment

 

 

The Centre for Research in Employment and Work (CREW) is holding a symposium on Public Sector Pay and Employment on Wed 20th March 2019 from 1-6 pm at Hamilton House, The University of Greenwich.

This seminar comes at a critical time for the public sector. The details are below. Could you advertise this to your members?

 

SEMINAR:

After nearly a decade of pay restraint in the UK public sector, pay settlements are now being reached at higher levels than the previous 1% limit. The Government has tried to restrict the first post-cap increases, but faced with recruitment and retention difficulties, especially in the NHS, in schools and elsewhere, there are upward pressures that cannot be ignored. This symposium will examine aspects of Government Policy, employee relations and pay and reward strategies in the context of a post-1% world. It will examine pay rises, progression pay, staff shortages and skill requirements across large parts of the public sector.

 

This symposium brings together a strong range of speakers with expertise on how pay decisions are made and the pressures experienced by negotiators, and key issues related to reward and to the current and future skill requirements in the public sector.

 

31st January 2019

Industrial Relations Research Unit / OHRM Warwick Business School University of Warwick Seminar Series

Industrial Relations Research Unit / OHRM
Warwick Business School University of Warwick
Seminar Series
Seminars are held from 2.00 to 3.30pm with refreshments to follow
TERM 2 2018/19:
Wednesday 6th February Matthew Amengual – University of Oxford
‘Labour Standards in Global Supply Chains:
Do Buyers Respond to Factory Audits?’
Room: 2.214, Warwick Business School
Wednesday 13th March Chunyun Li – London School of Economics and Political Science
‘From Insurgency to Movement:
An Embryonic Counterhegemonic Labor Movement in South China’
Room: 2.214, Warwick Business School
TERM 3 2018/19:
Wednesday 1st May Heather Connolly – University of Leicester
‘Representing Precarious Workers in Europe’
Room: TBC, Warwick Business School
Wednesday 22nd May Maria Gavris – University of Warwick
‘Changes in National Systems of Labour Administration’
Room: TBC, Warwick Business School
Wednesday 5th June Ana Lopes – Newcastle University
‘Women’s Participation in Trade Unions’
Room: TBC, Warwick Business School

31st January 2019

**Abstract submission deadline extended to 28th January 2019**

**Abstract submission deadline extended to 28th January 2019**
 
BUIRA Conference 2019
 
Uncertain Futures/Fractured Worlds:
The future of employment regulation and rights after Brexit.
 
Newcastle University Business School, 1-3 July 2019
 
Call for papers
As the withdrawal of the UK from the European Union occurs only months prior to our conference next year, a major question we need to discuss will be around the uncertain future of employment legislation and regulation post Brexit. 
A substantial amount of UK employment legislation is grounded in EU law.  Does this mean that the withdrawal from the EU will mean UK employment rights currently guaranteed by EU law would no longer be so guaranteed?  Theresa May had confirmed that workers’ existing legal rights will be guaranteed during her period in office – but her position has looked untenable for some time now, even more so recently.  A post-Brexit government could seek to amend or remove any of these.  Of course, what would be amended or removed is a much more open question, since it is affected by the political ideology of a future Government. We are fully aware of previous Conservative administrations’ long-standing opposition to many EU social rights.
 
What then, could be the effect on individuals who rely directly on EU law (i.e. the right to equal pay, agency workers, working time rights)?
 
Empirical (both quantitative and qualitative), analytical, conceptual and methodological papers are all welcome. We would particularly appreciate submissions from early career researchers and doctoral students. Papers concerning topics under the following headings will be particularly welcome:
 
•       Migrant workers from the EU and their position
•       Challenges for Trade Unions
•       Implications for Equality and Diversity
•       The EU and the (future of the) Social Dimension
 
Submission details
 
Abstracts of papers should be submitted via https://www.buira.org/admin/submissions/create
 
Deadline for submission of abstracts: Monday, 28th January 2019.
Abstracts are refereed anonymously by BUIRA Executive Committee members.

 

16th January 2019

Work and Equalities Institute, The University of Manchester Seminar series January to May 2019

Work and Equalities Institute, The University of Manchester

Seminar series January to May 2019

 

Dr Emily Yarrow, University of Edinburgh Business School

An unequal opportunity? Female academics’ experiences of research evaluation in the UK'

Date:              Wednesday 16th January 2019

Time:              15:30 – 17:00 Hrs (coffee/tea at 15:15)

Venue:          Alliance Manchester Business School East B7

 

 

Dr Edward Yates, Sheffield University Management School

Young workers and local economic development strategies in Greater Manchester

Date:              Wednesday 6th February 2019

Time:              15:30 – 17:00 Hrs (coffee/tea at 15:15)

Venue:          Alliance Manchester Business School 3.008

 

 

Dr Jean Jenkins, Cardiff Business School

Title to be confirmed

Date:              Wednesday 13th March 2019

Time:              15:30 – 17:00 Hrs (coffee/tea at 15:15)

Venue:          Alliance Manchester Business School 3.008

 

 

Prof Irena Grugulis, Leeds University Business School

Title to be confirmed

Date:              Wednesday 8th May 2019

Time:              15:30 – 17:00 Hrs (coffee/tea at 15:15)

Venue: Alliance Manchester Business School 3.008

11th December 2018

The School of Management at Swansea University are recruiting

he School of Management at Swansea University are recruiting in the area of People and Organisations:

 

Lecturer in People & Organisations: https://www.swansea.ac.uk/personnel/jobs/details.php?nPostingID=29518&nPostingTargetID=44292&option=52&sort=DESC&respnr=1&ID=QHUFK026203F3VBQB7VLO8NXD&LOV4=7813&LOV5=9450&JOBADLG=UK&Resultsperpage=20&lg=UK&mask=suext

 

Senior Lecturer in People & Organisations: https://www.swansea.ac.uk/personnel/jobs/details.php?nPostingID=29538&nPostingTargetID=44313&option=52&sort=DESC&respnr=1&ID=QHUFK026203F3VBQB7VLO8NXD&LOV4=7813&LOV5=9450&JOBADLG=UK&Resultsperpage=20&lg=UK&mask=suext  

 

For informal enquiries, please contact Professor Geraint Harvey (g.harvey@swansea.ac.uk).

11th December 2018

Doctoral program in Human Resources and Labor Relations at Michigan State University (USA

We are currently accepting applicants for our doctoral program in Human Resources and Labor Relations at Michigan State University (USA). We are looking for bright applicants who have an interest in examining issues involving work. Our program offers five years of funding, a tuition waiver, and health insurance. Unique attributes of our program include the ability of students to explore issues related to work from multiple points of view (e.g. employer, employee, union) and the opportunity for our students to take courses not only in our School of Human Resources and Labor Relations but also in other top programs across the MSU campus, such as those in the Management department or in Organizational Psychology. Our small size guarantees that each student will receive individualized attention and support.
 
If you are interested or have any students who may be interested in learning more about this program, please contact our doctoral program coordinator, Dr. Angela Hall ( athall@msu.edu), or go to the below website.
https://hrlr.msu.edu/prospective/doctoral/index.php#.W--xLfZRdPY 

11th December 2018

The Emerging Industrial Relations of China’, edited by William Brown and Chang Kai

The Emerging Industrial Relations of China’, edited by William Brown
and Chang Kai, published by Cambridge University Press, is now available
in paperback at £22.99.
Described as a ‘first-rate volume’ by Bruce Kaufman in Relations
Industrielles/Industrial Relations: ‘The major paradox they draw
attention to is that China and its government leaders have opted for a
policy of greater collective organization of industrial relations in
reaction to intensified market pressures and worker dissatisfaction,
while most other nations of the world have gone in the opposite
direction of deregulation and individualization of employment relations.’

11th December 2018

ILERA 12th European Congress 2019

In September 2019 the International Labor and Employment Relations Association (ILERA) will hold its 12th European Congress in Düsseldorf, Germany. The theme of the congress will be “Perspectives of Employment Relations in Europe” and thematic tracks will focus on issues such as equality & poverty, the regulation of labor, industrial democracy & workers’ voice as well as the quality of work & digitalization. The congress website and call for paper can be accessed at www.ilera2019.eu .

11th December 2018

BUIRA Conference 2019 Uncertain Futures/Fractured Worlds

BUIRA Conference 2019

Uncertain Futures/Fractured Worlds:

The future of employment regulation and rights after Brexit.

 

Newcastle University Business School, 1-3 July 2019

 

Call for papers now open

As the withdrawal of the UK from the European Union occurs only months prior to our conference next year, a major question we need to discuss will be around the uncertain future of employment legislation and regulation post Brexit. 

A substantial amount of UK employment legislation is grounded in EU law.  Does this mean that the withdrawal from the EU will mean UK employment rights currently guaranteed by EU law would no longer be so guaranteed?  Theresa May had confirmed that workers’ existing legal rights will be guaranteed during her period in office – but her position has looked untenable for some time now, even more so recently.  A post-Brexit government could seek to amend or remove any of these.  Of course, what would be amended or removed is a much more open question, since it is affected by the political ideology of a future Government. We are fully aware of previous Conservative administrations’ long-standing opposition to many EU social rights.

 

What then, could be the effect on individuals who rely directly on EU law (i.e. the right to equal pay, agency workers, working time rights)?

 

Empirical (both quantitative and qualitative), analytical, conceptual and methodological papers are all welcome. We would particularly appreciate submissions from early career researchers and doctoral students. Papers concerning topics under the following headings will be particularly welcome:

 

  • Migrant workers from the EU and their position
  • Challenges for Trade Unions
  • Implications for Equality and Diversity
  • The EU and the (future of the) Social Dimension

 

Submission details

 

Abstracts of papers should be submitted via https://www.buira.org/admin/submissions/create

 

Deadline for submission of abstracts: Monday, 14th January 2019.

Abstracts are refereed anonymously by BUIRA Executive Committee members.

23rd November 2018

BUIRA 2019 Stream/ Panel Event – Progressive Employers and Positive Employment Relations.

BUIRA 2019 Stream/ Panel Event – Progressive Employers and Positive Employment Relations – Newcastle – 1-3 July 2019.

Current trends in radical and pluralist industrial relations tend to emphasise employee organizing from below and trade unions as independent social movements, on the one hand; or state regulation from above, on the other (see Heery 2016). In the latter spirit, the 2017 Labour Party manifesto promised to 'roll out sectoral collective bargaining'. The missing link is these narratives is the progressive employer, or what Hyman (2015) has termed, 'good capitalism'. Even the large Partnership literature (see Johnstone 2015), has tended to focus on trade union behaviour.

Organized workers need stable employer recognition for unions to thrive (Simms 2013), something it's almost impossible for the state to impose without substantial employer support. As Ackers (2015) argues, trade union legitimacy power rests on a diamond of stakeholders: employees, the state (political parties), public opinion and employers. Arguably, the last play an important role in shaping the others. More widely, good working conditions and policies to counter the spread of cut-price employment policies like zero-hour contracts, depend on labour market leadership by progressive employers, unionised and non-union.

Progressive employers, such Lever and Cadbury, played a central role in the C20th rise of joint regulations (Clegg et al 1964, Clegg 1985, 1994). British 'Paternalists' not only championed good stable working conditions and employee welfare, but as 'sophisticated moderns' (Fox 1974) promoted and spread trade unions and pluralist IR among the 'standard modern' mainstream. Public employers also spread good employment practice.

This stream/ panel (depending on numbers) invites papers on any aspect of the progressive employer, past, present or future. We are particularly interested in examples of active agency in Developing Positive Employment Relations ((Johnstone & Wilkinson 2016), which challenge the current picture of employers as passive receivers of employment rules. Any employer that promotes good employee working conditions will qualify!

Peter Ackers & Stewart Johnstone

The organisers are happy to discuss ideas for potential submissions peter.ackers1@virginmedia.com; stewart.johnstone@ncl.ac.uk

23rd November 2018

Is whistleblowing the new normal?

HE UNIVERSITY OF GREENWICH WORK AND EMPLOYMENT RESEARCH UNIT /
CENTRE FOR RESEARCH ON EMPLOYMENT AND WORK
 
 Is whistleblowing the new normal?
 
Wednesday 12th December 2018
TIME: 15.00 – 18.00
 
VENUE:  Room HH102, Hamilton House, Park Vista, Greenwich SE10 9LZ
 
In the context of whistleblowing, policy-makers have recently started to shift the focus from the person of the whistleblower towards the recipients of whistleblowing, i.e. those whom whistleblowers call upon to stop wrongdoing. Increasingly, organisations are implementing speak-up policies through procedures, training, and in-house or outsourced hotlines. Is this a new form of managerialism? Is it, as some voice scholars wrote recently (Barry & Wilkinson, 2016 BJIR), "pro-social or pro-management"? On the other hand, research shows that external whistleblowing is most often a result of badly managed internal whistleblowing. Hence, the way organisations institutionalise whistleblowing warrants our attention. This seminar discusses the institutionalisation of whistleblowing, around four pieces of recent research.

 

Dr Erik Mygind du Plessis, Copenhagen Business School.
"Speaking truth through power: Conceptualizing internal hotlines using Foucault's dispositive."

 

Prof David Lewis, Middlesex University.
"What information about whistleblowing do the FTSE top 100 firms post on their website?"

 

Dr Mahaut Fanchini, University of Paris-Dauphine.
“The co-construction of whistleblowing: How expectations of the recipient frame ‘acceptable’ whistleblowing narratives."

 

Arron Phillips, University of Greenwich.
"Do trade union members blow the whistle differently? Exploring data from a UK whistleblower advice line."

 
Chaired by Dr Wim Vandekerckhove, University of Greenwich


Speakers:
 
Erik Du Plessis is assistant Professor at the Department of Management, Politics and Philosophy at Copenhagen Business School. His research explores ways in which whistleblowing is institutionalised. Previous studies include whistleblowing in the context of Danish trade unions.

David Lewis is Professor of Employment Law at Middlesex University. He is the convenor of the International Whistleblowing Research Network. He is head of the Whistleblowing Research Unit at Middlesex University, and has published widely on the topic of whistleblowing since the mid-1990s.

Mahaut Francini is Assistant Professor in Organisation Studies at the University of Paris-Dauphine. Her research focuses on understanding practices and discourses related to the reception of whistleblowing episodes.

Arron Phillips is a WERU/CREW PhD student at the University of Greenwich. His current research focuses on the role of trade unions in the whistleblowing process.

Wim Vandekerckhove is Reader in Business Ethics at the University of Greenwich, and WERU/CREW member. He has provided expertise on whistleblowing to various stakeholders, including Council of Europe, Transparency International, ACCA, British Standards Institute, Financial Conduct Authority, Department of Health, and Public Concern at Work. He is currently the convenor of the ISO working group (TC309/WG3) developing an international standard on internal whistleblowing systems.
 
This is a free seminar, open to the public and all are invited, but please can you inform us if you are planning to attend from outside the University of Greenwich by registering your interest at:   Business School Events with your name, job title and organisation to attend. Or email Dr Ruth Ballardie on R.T.Ballardie@greenwich.ac.uk


HOW TO FIND US:
Hamilton House, 15 Park Vista, Greenwich, London SE10 9LZ
Telephone: +44 20 8331 9083 E-mail: i3centre@gre.ac.uk

21st November 2018

2018 CIPD Applied Research Conference

Dear colleague,

We still have places available for the 2018 CIPD Applied Research Conference taking place at Nottingham Business School on 5-6 December.

 

Improving the world of work rests on quality research feeding into employment policy and practice. Now in its 4th year, the Applied Research Conference exists for this purpose, strengthening links between research and practice. Come and be a part of it!

 

Information on the programme, bookings and previous years’ conferences is available at www.cipd.co.uk/arc

 

I hope to see you there. Please share this email with any colleagues you think may be interested.

21st November 2018

Massey University, NZ - vacancy for Head of School

Massey University, NZ - vacancy for Head of School

 

Massey Business School is one of New Zealand’s (NZ) leading and largest business schools, and is ranked in the top 2% business schools globally. The School of Management is a large academic unit based at Auckland and Palmerston North, with particular strengths in Human Resource Management and Employment Relations.

 

The Head of School of Management will provide effective academic leadership and management, within the strategic framework of Massey Business School and wider University. You will be a dynamic, innovative and effective academic leader, who possesses a clear and compelling vision to shape the future direction, academic development and research achievements of the School. Proven management and financial planning skills, along with superior human resource management abilities, are also essential for this role. This role will offer you an outstanding opportunity to further develop a well-established and internationally recognised School, with the flexibility to be based in either the Auckland campus in Albany, or the Manawatu campus in Palmerston North.

 

Appointment will be on a permanent (tenured) basis, with the role as Head of School being an initial term of five years, after which time a further term may be available. Preference is for candidates appointable at Professorial level, although Associate Professor may be considered for the right candidate.

 

Applications close on 13 January 2019.

 

Details available at http://massey-careers.massey.ac.nz/10588/head-of-school-of-management

 

Further enquiries should be directed to: Professor Stephen Kelly Pro Vice-Chancellor, Massey Business SchoolS.J.Kelly@massey.ac.nz

21st November 2018

Work and well-being in the 21st century

The Regulating for Decent Work Organizing Committee is delighted to announce the Call for Abstracts for its 2019 RDW Conference.

 

The Conference is on the theme  Work and well-being in the 21st century and will be held at the International Labour Office, Geneva, Switzerland from 8–10 July 2019. The conference is organised around four tracks:

 

·         Transitions and transformations in the world of work

·         Rethinking capitalism

·         Well-being in the world of work

·         Building and renewing institutions: a social contract for the 21st century

 

As you may know the Conference is organized by the International Labour Office (ILO) in collaboration with:

  • Amsterdam Institute for Labour Studies / Hugo Sinzheimer Instituut (AIAS-HSI) University of Amsterdam, Netherlands
  • Centre for Employment and Labour Relations Law (CELRL) University of Melbourne, Australia
  • Centre for Informal Sector and Labor Studies (CISLS)  Jawaharlal Nehru University, India
  • Durham Law School (DLS) University of Durham, UK
  • Institut für Arbeit und Qualifikation (IAQ) University of Duisburg-Essen, Germany
  • Institute for Applied Economic Research (IPEA) Brasilia, Brazil
  • Korea Labor Institute (KLI) Seoul, Republic of Korea
  • Work and Equalities Institute (WEI) University of Manchester, UK

Please circulate the Call for Abstracts, among your colleagues and networks. The link for submissions of abstracts and other details can be found at the conference website at: http://www.ilo.org/rdw2019.

20th November 2018

David Winchester

David Winchester 

Sadly David Winchester - BUIRA member who taught at the LSE (1970-78) and then Warwick (1978-2001) - died on October 23. His funeral will be on Friday November 16 and in the afternoon (from 1 p.m.) friends, family and colleagues are getting together to celebrate his life. This will be at The Orangery, Goldney Hall, University of Bristol, Lower Clifton Hill, Bristol BS8 1BH. 

Please email stephanietailby@gmail.com for further detail. 

2nd November 2018

Applications are invited for a fixed-term temporary Lecturer in Human Resource Management/Employment Studies.

Applications are invited for a fixed-term temporary Lecturer in Human Resource Management/Employment Studies.

Vacancy HUM-12990/Lecturer in Human Resource Management/Employment Studies[Lecturer in Human Resource Management/Employment Studies], 

https://www.jobs.manchester.ac.uk/displayjob.aspx?jobid=16343

The closing date is 15/11/2018.

2nd November 2018

Call for papers and special issue expressions of interest

Call for papers and special issue expressions of interest

Labour and Industry: A journal of the social and economic relations of work is published by Taylor and Francis and is the official journal of the Association of Industrial Relations Academics of Australia and New Zealand (AIRAANZ). The journal was recently ranked ‘2’ by the UK Chartered Association of Business Schools (CABS) and retained its ‘B’ in the Australian Business Deans Council (ABDC) list.

The journal is increasingly international and multi-disciplinary in focus. We welcome high-quality submissions that develop understanding of employment relations, human resource management and the sociology of work. We are also keen to receive proposals for special issues. For further information please consult our website (https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rlab20/current) or contact our editorial team:  Professor Jim Arrowsmith (j.arrowsmith@massey.ac.nz); Dr Noelle Donnelly (Noelle.Donnelly@vuw.ac.nz); or Professor Jane Parker (j.parker@massey.ac.nz).

2nd November 2018

BUIRA History of Industrial Relations Study Group

BUIRA History of Industrial Relations Study Group

 

The German Revolution 1918: Industrial Relations and Social Change

Wednesday 7 November 2018: 15.30-17.30 (tea/coffee from 15.00)

Room C379, University of Westminster Business School, 35 Marylebone Road, London NW1 5LS (opposite Madame Tussauds and nearly opposite Baker Street tube)


For further details or to reserve a place, please e-mail

Michael Gold (m.gold@rhul.ac.uk) or Linda Clarke (clarkel@wmin.ac.uk).

Programme:


3.00-3.20pm: Tea/ coffee/ refreshments

3.20pm: Welcome and introductions: Michael Gold and Linda Clarke (Chairs)

 

3.30-4.00pm: Ralf Hoffrogge

Shop Stewards and Revolution: From Workers´ Councils to Works Councils (1916-1920)

In German industrial relations, works councils, established in 1920 and re-introduced into West German labour law in 1952, guarantee representation of employees independently of trade-union membership or recognition. This long standing institution of German corporatism evolved out of the council movement during the Revolution 1918/1919. Usually, the councils are identified with icons such as Rosa Liebknecht and Rosa Luxemburg, but their specific origins lay in the mass strikes organized by rebellious shop stewards since 1916. This presentation outlines the history of the so-called Revolutionary Shop Stewards, a network organizing anti-war mass strikes between 1916 and 1918 and a backbone of the council movement during the German Revolution of 1918-1919. Over this period, the Revolutionary Shop Stewards managed to become a synthesis of an avant-garde group and grassroots organization, pushing the masses forward but never failing to maintain a mode of democratic representation. However, the presentation also traces its dissolution, which started in 1919.

 

4.00-4.30pm: James Muldoon

Rosa Luxemburg and Karl Kautsky on the Prospects for a Socialist Democracy

The emergence of workers' and soldiers' councils across Germany during 1918 brought an end to the reign of the Kaiser and opened the possibility of radical social and political transformation. With conservative and reactionary groups temporarily obstructed and overwhelmed, the Executive Council of the Workers’ and Soldiers’ Councils declared itself the highest political authority of the Socialist Republic of Germany and ordered that the councils’ power ‘must be secured and expanded so that the achievements of the revolution will benefit the entire working class’. Various political theorists and actors within the council movement developed different, sometimes competing, conceptions of how Germany could be transformed into a socialist or workers' democracy. This paper analyses two visions for the future of German politics and contrasts the different strategies, institutions and goals of revolutionary struggle in the political writings of Karl Kautsky and Rosa Luxemburg in order to shed new light on what is at stake for contemporary politics.

 

4.30-5.00pm: General discussion

5.00pm: Close (followed by drinks until 5.30pm)
 

The speakers:

James Muldoon is a lecturer in political science at the University of Exeter. He is editor of Council Democracy: Towards a Democratic Socialist Politics; Trumping the Mainstream: the Conquest of Mainstream Democratic Politics by the Populist Right; and the forthcoming The German Revolution and Political Theory. He is also the author of Hegel’s Philosophy of Drives.

 

Ralf Hoffrogge is postdoctoral researcher at Ruhr-Universität Bochum (Germany) and has published widely on German labour history. His special interest is in biographies, German-Jewish relations within the Labour movement and German Communism during the Weimar Republic. He is currently working on a historical comparison of the German metalworkers’ union Industriegewerkschaft Metall and the British Amalgamated Engineering Union (AEU).

 

2nd November 2018

Vale Dr Sandra Cockfield, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia

Vale Dr Sandra Cockfield, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia


It is with great sadness that we share the news that our Australian industrial relations colleague, Dr Sandra Cockfield, passed away peacefully on 21 October 2018. She had attended more than one BUIRA conference. If you knew her and will be in Melbourne on 9 Nov. 2018, you might consider attending a Celebration of the Life of Sandra. If you wish to do so, please RSVP at:   

www.eventbrite.com.au/e/celebration-of-the-life-of-dr-sandra-cockfield-registration-51863861205     RSVP only if you wish to attend. Thanks.

 

Sandra was an exceptional woman – witty, generous and caring, she leaves us much too young following a battle with cancer. She had an extensive knowledge of politics, and was passionate about justice and fairness in her personal and academic life. She leaves behind her a life full of achievements and legacies and will be greatly missed by family, friends, colleagues and students.
Sandra’s higher education was at Griffith University, Brisbane, Australia. She was subsequently a valuable and well-read Senior Lecturer at Monash University, Melbourne. Sandra was a dedicated teacher who specialised in the areas of industrial relations and negotiations. Sandra was highly regarded, especially across the Australian industrial relations community. She was an approachable teacher and friend who saw the positive in people and was inclusive of others. 
Her research on industrial relations had a particular focus on union organisation and strategy, and her thinking was influential in Australia and internationally. Her contributions to the field of research and student learning relating to these topics is substantial and significant. Sandra had a passion for understanding and contributing to sustainability and had also researched and published on sustainable small-scale farming in India. 
Sandra was committed to providing service to governments and other organisations. The National Tertiary Education Union (NTEU) awarded Sandra Life Membership, a rare honour, which recognised her great service to workplace relations at Monash University and beyond. This included being on the NTEU Enterprise Bargaining Team at Monash for twelve years. 
Sandra built a valuable professional reputation and was a co-organiser of activities, for example, with two of her Australian professional societies, the Industrial Relations Society, and the Association of Industrial Relations Academics of Australia and New Zealand. She also contributed as Co-Director, Australian Consortium for Research in Employment and Work, Monash University.

Her contribution to all these organisations will be greatly missed and will remain her legacy long into the future. Sandra was a dear friend to many. Times shared with Sandra talking politics and current affairs were very special. All those who knew her are deeply saddened by her passing, but take comfort and will find joy in the memories of great times shared together. Sandra was an avid traveller. We are very sad to lose her and extend our sincerest condolences to her family.


Instead of sending flowers, a fund will be established to facilitate a lasting tribute to Sandra. For more details, please ask the undersigned. Thanks again.

 

Greg Bamber, Professor, Monash University, in consultation Sandra’s family and close friends: gregbamber@gmail.com

1st November 2018

Call for Papers Gender, Race, and Diversity in Organisations (GRDO) Strategic Interest Group European Academy of Management, June 26-28, 2019, Lisbon, Portugal

Call for Papers
Gender, Race, and Diversity in Organisations (GRDO) Strategic Interest Group
European Academy of Management, June 26-28, 2019, Lisbon, Portugal

Submission Deadline: January 15, 2019

GRDO SIG Chairwoman: Beverly Metcalf
GRDO SIG Program Chair: Hamid Kazeroony, hamid.kazeroony2@mail.waldenu.edu 

For detail submission requirements please see SIG 05: Gender, Race, and Diversity in Organisations (GRDO)

 

T05_02 - Disability equality, fact or fiction? Future directions for workplace integration.

Globally equality legislation has promoted the rights of persons with disabilities (PWD), however, these rights remain elusive in practice. PWD are the largest underutilised labour market group and face distinct disadvantage entering and inside the labour market. Where organisations promote equality and diversity through management practices, there remains a policy to practice implementation gap and weak legislative enforcement of rights. This stream will address the ableist environment which poses challenges to disability inclusion. It will consider key debates on legislative impact, workplace integration for PWD, policy implementation gaps and specific challenges and enablers in the workplace.

 Laura William, University of Greenwich, L.C.William@Greenwich.ac.uk​​

 

29th October 2018

Is whistleblowing the new normal?

Is whistleblowing the new normal?

 

Wednesday 12th December 2018

TIME: 15.00 – 18.00

VENUE:  Room HH102, Hamilton House, Park Vista, Greenwich    SE10 9LZ

 

In the context of whistleblowing, policy-makers have recently started to shift the focus from the person of the whistleblower towards the recipients of whistleblowing, i.e. those whom whistleblowers call upon to stop wrongdoing. Increasingly, organisations are implementing speak-up policies through procedures, training, and in-house or outsourced hotlines. Is this a new form of managerialism? Is it, as some voice scholars wrote recently (Barry & Wilkinson, 2016 BJIR), "pro-social or pro-management"? On the other hand, research shows that external whistleblowing is most often a result of badly managed internal whistleblowing. Hence, the way organisations institutionalise whistleblowing warrants our attention. This seminar discusses the institutionalisation of whistleblowing, around four pieces of recent research.

 

Dr Erik Mygind du Plessis, Copenhagen Business School.

"Speaking truth through power: Conceptualizing internal hotlines using Foucault's dispositive."

 

Prof David Lewis, Middlesex University.

"What information about whistleblowing do the FTSE top 100 firms post on their website?"

 

Dr Mahaut Fanchini, University of Paris-Dauphine.

“The co-construction of whistleblowing: How expectations of the recipient frame ‘acceptable’ whistleblowing narratives."

 

Arron Phillips, University of Greenwich.

"Do trade union members blow the whistle differently? Exploring data from a UK whistleblower advice line."

 

Chaired by Dr Wim Vandekerckhove, University of Greenwich

 

Bios:

Erik Du Plessis is assistant Professor at the Department of Management, Politics and Philosophy at Copenhagen Business School. His research explores ways in which whistleblowing is institutionalised. Previous studies include whistleblowing in the context of Danish trade unions.

 

David Lewis is Professor of Employment Law at Middlesex University. He is the convenor of the International Whistleblowing Research Network. He is head of the Whistleblowing Research Unit at Middlesex University, and has published widely on the topic of whistleblowing since the mid-1990s.

 

Mahaut Francini is Assistant Professor in Organisation Studies at the University of Paris-Dauphine. Her research focuses on understanding practices and discourses related to the reception of whistleblowing episodes.

 

Arron Phillips is a WERU/CREW PhD student at the University of Greenwich. His current research focuses on the role of trade unions in the whistleblowing process.

 

Wim Vandekerckhove is Reader in Business Ethics at the University of Greenwich, and WERU/CREW member. He has provided expertise on whistleblowing to various stakeholders, including Council of Europe, Transparency International, ACCA, British Standards Institute, Financial Conduct Authority, Department of Health, and Public Concern at Work. He is currently the convenor of the ISO working group (TC309/WG3) developing an international standard on internal whistleblowing systems.

 

This is a free seminar, open to the public and all are invited, but please can you inform us if you are planning to attend from outside the University of Greenwich by registering your interest at:   Business School Events with your name, job title and organisation to attend. Or email Dr Ruth Ballardie on R.T.Ballardie@greenwich.ac.uk

 

25th October 2018

BUIRA is on Twitter and on Facebook!

For the all  latest news, follow BUIRA on Twitter @BUIRAonline and on facebook https://www.facebook.com/BUIRAonline/

 

19th September 2016


Archive